Crowdfunding Campuses: What is the target audience for CircleUp?  Are there certain requirements the business must meet in order to raise funds with CircleUp (ex: proof of concept, annual revenue benchmarks, etc.), or will you work with people who simply have an idea as well?

Ryan Caldbeck: Our audience is both accredited investors and high-growth consumer brands.  CircleUp  focuses on consumer product and retail companies with more than $1 million in revenue.  These are high-growth consumer brands that you use and love, but have traditionally been underfunded by historical fundraising sources such as Silicon Valley (which focuses on technology).  On the investor side, we focus on accredited investors.  Many of our investors have strong backgrounds in consumer-related businesses, either as investors or entrepreneurs.

As I mentioned, we are carefully limiting access to the site to high-growth consumer focused companies with significant revenue.  We accept less than 2% of applicants.  Our team has 11 years’ experience sourcing deals in these industries for leading Private Equity firms including TSG Consumer, JH Partners and Encore Consumer Capital.  Along with our network of investors and advisors, many of whom have deep consumer experience, we believe we can source high quality deal flow on the platform within this market segment.

Crowdfunding Campuses: What type of consulting does the CircleUp team provide to SMEs (small & medium sized enterprises) prior to the business owner attempting to raise capital? Is your team hands-on with consulting?

RC: Importantly, we do not to provide advice to the companies on CircleUp, but we do provide significant value through a number of partnerships. For example, we provide free industry data through a relationship with SPINs, a third party data provider, and we provide free samples to all of our investors through a relationship with Swaggable. Post close we have a number of partnerships that help our companies grow. For example, we have partnerships with Fortune 500 companies that are excited to work with the innovative brands that come out of our platform.

Crowdfunding Campuses: Crowdfunding Campuses is attempting to bridge the gap between the local business community and the collegian institutions.  How can CircleUp help bridge that gap to strengthen the local ecosystem around collegian institutions?

RC: It is an important question because we think institutions of higher learning are where some of the best innovation is developed.  Many of the businesses that are started in and around universities today are in the consumer and retail space. Although that segment (consumer and retail) is 20% of the economy, it is only 4% of angel funding. This imbalance can make it difficult for these businesses to raise capital. We help eliminate that inefficiency and allow those entrepreneurs, many of whom come out of those great universities, to raise money more effectively.

Crowdfunding Campuses: How does CircleUp attract investors to the site, and how will the vetting & matching processes work for investors who are seeking a new venture to back?

RC: CircleUp is the largest equity-based crowdfunding site in the US and has been able to attract an incredible investor network- largely through word of mouth.  While we have been fortunate to get some great attention in the press, many of our investors find us through referrals from other investors already on CircleUp. One of the exciting trends we’ve seen this year is an increasing growth rate of our referrals.  Investors are joining CircleUp, getting excited about what they find, and are telling their friends or colleagues.

Crowdfunding Campuses: A critical component of the crowdfunding industry relies on transparency and proper education.  What steps can students & teachers, being non-business owners, begin to take NOW that will allow them to take advantage of CircleUp’s platform in the future?

RC: Investing in businesses, whether through an equity-based crowdfunding site like CircleUp or “offline” takes education. The best thing students and teachers can do is to educate themselves on making investments into private companies. We have an increasingly robust investor education section on CircleUp, but I would recommend people looking to invest educate themselves by talking with other more experienced investors, reading investing trade publications and talking with professional advisors.

Crowdfunding Campuses: If you had to list CircleUp’s three biggest accomplishments/accolades to date, what would they be?  This is your time to brag about yourself.

RC: We have the largest group of accredited investors in the US, we have had more capital invested through our site than any other equity-based crowdfunding site and have signed amazing partnerships with Fortune 500 consumer companies – all three accomplishments are a nice testament to our approach.

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FundaGeek is the go-to crowdfunding platform for technical innovators and researchers alike who need to raise funds for their projects. CEO Daniel Gutierrez tells us why crowdfunding and sites like FundaGeek are important to the future of higher education.

Crowdfunding Campuses: What is FundaGeek doing differently in the crowdfunding space that no other portal is doing? What are your key differentiators?

Daniel Gutierrez: The main area that we differ from a lot of the crowdfunding sites is that we focus on areas that are away from the traditional art, music and film, or the creative arts. We’re more of a site for innovative technology. If you have software or an invention, or some sort of research that you’re doing, something that’s more of a technical nature or innovative, that’s where we are in crowdfunding.

Crowdfunding Campuses: Talk about your education portal.  How will this directly help students and educators?

DG: That is for any sort of school, after school program, or anything really related to education. We have tips, a special FAQ section, and some examples of what crowdfunding for education might entail. It would help educators that have a budget crunch. Maybe they have a project they really believe in but don’t have the budget for it, so they come to FundaGeek and post a crowdfunding campaign to raise the money in an alternative manner. We’re really excited about that because we believe in education and hope it will provide an alternative to traditional funding.

Crowdfunding Campuses: Talk about your research portal.  How will this directly help higher education institutions?

DG: This is more for colleges and universities. If you have an undergrad researcher who probably wont get grant money from professors or principal investors, they can come to FundaGeek and raise their own money for their project. Because they’re underclassmen, it’s probably the only way they’ll get money, so we feel it’s a really good alternative for students to find funds for research. Not everyone can get grants.

Crowdfunding Campuses: As of this moment, Crowdfunding is a relatively unknown funding approach in the world of higher education. In your opinion, how can we increase awareness about the option of crowdfunding for higher education communities?

DG: We have organizations likes yours, for starters, who are getting the word out. We do all we can through press releases and the blogosphere and we try to post everywhere we can. It’s word of mouth. We feel the more projects we get in this space, the more people will learn about it and then spread the word to others. Crowdfunding is still relatively unknown in the education arena, so we need to work hard and use all the avenues we have to spread the word. It’s working slowly, but it’s hard to change people’s minds. There are a lot of questions in people’s minds, so we have to break those down.

Crowdfunding Campuses: Will FundaGeek be affected by the pending legislation of the JOBS Act, and if so, how will your business model change a year from now?

DG: It will supplement our current business model. When we started FundaGeek, the JOBS Act wasn’t even being discussed yet. Now it’s signed into law but the SEC is trudging along. We’re going to jump on it, we’re thinking about it, and we’re planning for it. It’ll supplement our rewards-based model by adding in equity-based crowdfunding. In our specific nature of crowdfunding, it makes more sense for those start-up companies to be able to offer unlimited equity into their companies, and not all crowdfunding portals are adopting the equity-based model, so we may have a lead there.

Crowdfunding Campuses: Has FundaGeek had any successful funding raises to date that are specific to collegian institutions, alumni groups, fraternities/sororities, or other student-groups?

DG: There are two that we’re really proud of. Two undergrad researchers came to us early on in the process. They were doing scientific research, and they had great ideas to do projects of their own. They successfully raised funding on their own through us. They were really adept at using social media and their own networks to publicize their projects and themselves. They got some good funding, and were able to go to the jungles of Indonesia to do their research. So that’s a good example of how education was helped through FundaGeek.

http://www.fundageek.com

Amanda Murphy ’14, News Editor

November 6, 2012
Filed under News

Crowdfunding Campuses, a program launched by Handshake 360, is making it’s way to Saint Joseph’s University. The primary purpose of Crowdfunding Campuses is to educate students on how to acquire alternate means of funding for major projects or business endeavors.

Kevin Provost, CEO of Handshake 360, said, “We’ve bridged that gap between the student who has an idea, has a passion, has a dream about either a project they want to start, a fundraiser that they want to begin for charity or a business plan. We help them connect the dots and reach out to a crowd of supporters who would be in favor of providing their opinion, their professional networks, and obviously their pocketbooks, to help that student reach their professional ambition.”

Crowdfunding Campuses is a two-part program that brings industry leaders to college campuses. The first part is a showcasing event, where companies come to explain their industry to both students and educators, their platform and to whom it tailors. Examples include artists, musicians, entrepreneurs, journalists, and more. Each company gets fifteen minutes during the first event and then students have the opportunity to ask questions about how to start raising money for their project.

Second, Webcasting meetings will be provided at a later time where students and educators can get on at any time and work hand in hand with Crowdfunding Campuses and its partners about specific project questions. This will happen after the showcase event, when students reach out to discuss fundraising strategies.

On Thursday, Oct. 25, Lauren Bogen, ’13, president of Saint Joseph’s American Marketing Association (AMA), Michelle Bodnar, ’13, vice president of communication and advertising for the AMA, Veronica Polce, ’13, vice president of fundraising and programming for AMA, Adrienne Mishoe, ’13, vice president of membership and finance for AMA, and Adriana Zegarell, ’14, vice president of community service for AMA, had a phone conference with Provost and Cory Stelzman, business development coordinator for Handshake 360, to discuss the program and when it can come to St. Joe’s.

Provost said, “Typically, we open the door to the parent network, alumni network, and members of your businesses in the local community. Anybody who is interested who is also affiliated with St. Joes is invited.” Provost continued, “You think of an industry, and there’s a Crowdfunding Campuses site for that industry.”

Bodnar responded, “Every club here at St. Joes does struggle with raising funds because it is hard, so I think this would be an interesting thing to bring to students and organizations because for us, we do a lot of events that require us to have funds.”

Polce added, “Everyone seems to be doing the same fundraiser at the same place within the same week. We need more creative ideas and different ways to approach them.”

Provost responded, “This showcase event that you guys are going to be hosting is really just a stepping stone. What happens at the end of the showcase event: we actually pass around flyers and surveys to every single person in the room. If you’re a student there’s a section for you, if you’re faculty, if you’re an administrator there’s a section for you, if you’re alumni there’s a section for you. The point of the survey is to figure out what is the need of that individual group so we can customize a plan for you guys…so you can take the next step.”

AMA will create a committee of five students and three advisors, with one student chair and one advisor chair to sponsor Crowdfunding Campuses’ showcase event this semester, once they decide on a date.

Dave Allen, PhD., associate professor of marketing and AMA’s advisor, was unable to participate in the conference call, but will be meeting with the AMA to discuss the plans for the event.

After the conference Bogen said, “We are still dealing with the logistics of it because it’s such a large event, there are very few places on campus where we can actually hold it. So right now, we are just seeing if those rooms are available, would we be able to get all the hook-ups we need.” She continued, “This is a great learning opportunity for them [the student body] and we need to make it a successful event and we need to have a lot of people.”

Bogen continued, “I think it’s a great way to get connections to small businesses [who] obviously have deeper pockets [with which to support us]… We are a marketing organization, so creating those small business links are vital.”

For more information on Crowdfunding Campuses follow them on Twitter @crowdfundcampus, “Like” them onFacebook or find them on their website.

Source: http://hawkhillnews.com/news/2012/11/06/crowdfunding-introduced-to-saint-joes/

CrowdsUnite.com is a tool that allows people to find all the information they need to about crowdfunding platforms in one place. Alex Feldman, CEO and Founder, talks about CrowdsUnite.com‘s place in the industry.

Crowdfunding Campuses:  What is your stake in the crowdfunding industry? What role do you anticipate playing as a site that lists all the various portals?

AF: On top of listing all crowdfunding platforms we categorize them as well. We make it easier for people who are raising money to find the best platform for their need. With over 700 platforms globally it can be a nightmare finding and comparing them. We make it very easy to filter, sort and compare platforms.

Additionally to organizing the crowdfunding space we also let users review and read articles associated with the platforms.

Crowdfunding Campuses:  How do you monetize your business model? Ads? Subscriptions?

AF: We are currently not monetizing the website. We believe we are offering a valuable service to this industry. For the crowdfunding industry to exist services like CrowdsUnite need to be there to offer transparency to the platforms. Managing a website is costly so we do plan to offer advertisement in the future.

Crowdfunding Campuses: How does your rankings system work?

AF: Our ranking is based fully on the users. We do not get involved in the review process.

Crowdfunding Campuses: What role does your company play in the education arena & how can students take advantage of your site?

AF: Our website is open to everybody. It’s one resource for students to use when they need to raise money. Since students have a limited financial history going to a bank for a loan may be difficult. In crowdfunding we eliminate the middleman and let people give money directly to other people. So if students want to raise money either by equity, debt, reward or donation our website will show them which crowdfunding platforms are best suited for them.

As one of the most well known crowdfunding platforms available, Indiegogo has been helping people successfully raise funds for their ideas for quite some time. Danae Ringelmann, Founder and Chief Operating Officer of Indiegogo, took some time to give Crowdfunding Campuses her thoughts on crowdfunding and how important it is to higher education.

Crowdfunding Campuses: If you look at the crowdfunding portals today, you have the “catch-all platforms” and the “niche-platforms” that focus on a specific target audience. Are you more of a niche player or more of a catch-all platform?

DR: Indiegogo is the world’s largest crowdfunding platform, empowering anyone, anywhere, anytime, to raise funds for any idea. We’re completely open and we don’t require submitting an application to start a campaign. Our goal is to democratize fundraising, which means we’re open to any and all projects. Some of our top areas of fundraising include technology/gadget, gaming, cause, film, music, small business, sports, community, health and education.

Crowdfunding Campuses: Will the JOBS Act & the pending legislation that’s anticipated on the equity-side of the industry change Indiegogo’s approach at all, and if so, how will your business model be different a year from now when the regulations are anticipated to be concrete?

DR: At Indiegogo, we pride ourselves on being an open and flexible platform. The pending change in regulations will certainly expand opportunities for people in the United States.  We have been consistently taking feedback from our customers and the general public about how we can improve Indiegogo, as it relates to investing and other forms of fundraising, and we will continue to optimize and modify the product accordingly. We’re also in constant talks with the SEC, helping them navigate through the waters of equity crowdfunding.

Crowdfunding Campuses: If you could speak to students about crowdfunding and the potential that the industry has in it’s ability to influence their lives, what would the overall value-added proposition be for the average student to encourage him/her to get involved immediately?

DR: Crowdfunding is a new way of getting funding for ideas.  Instead of being limited by maxing out credit cards, waiting for banks loans, or filling out grant applications, crowdfunding is a fast and engaging way to raise money. The benefits of crowdfunding also go way beyond just raising funds, but also gaining validation for your idea, marketing and promotion, and all the email address and data you can get from the process.

Crowdfunding Campuses: Given the declining rate in which college graduates are able to land a job that is commiserate with their education, do you think educators should begin teaching students about crowdfunding? If so, what can Indiegogo offer educators to help them update their curriculum?

DR: With the rising popularity of crowdfunding, it is important for people to be educated in the industry and its platforms. Indiegogo’s Insights blog is a great resource for those interested in learning about crowdfunding.

Crowdfunding Campuses: Colleges are facing tough times now.  Increasing tuition costs, reduced availability of grant money, decreasing alumni donor pools, outdated technology, and under-resourced classrooms are among the many hurdles faced by institutions.  How can Indiegogo help institutions lighten the financial burden?

DR: Crowdfunding allows people and organizations to easily reach those outside their networks that may want to contribute to their cause, business or project. It is an excellent resource for organizations that want to build awareness for their projects and efforts. It can be incredibly useful to empower people to raise funds on their own, gain validation and feedback from the crowds, and build closer more innovative relationships with people with similar interests. We’ve had several campaigns where college students are raising money for tuition or a new laptop for school, etc. We feel that universities should get involved and educate their students on the power of crowdfunding to lighten their student’s financial burden because with a lot of hard work and passion, any student can raise funds for anything. On the other side, colleges should embrace crowdfunding as a tool to generate funds—with huge alumni networks and current student bodies, we would love to see a collegiate crowdfunding campaign that was able to offset costs, whether it be for a sports program, Greek life, or even to renovate the student union.

Crowdfunding Campuses: Has Indiegogo had any successful funding raises to date that are specific to collegian institutions, alumni groups, fraternities/sororities, or other student-groups?

DR: With Indiegogo being completely open to everyone, it has had campaigns created by all types of groups and organizations. Below are a few campaigns that I thought might be of interest to you:

For the past week, Brian Meece was lecturing at college campuses across the country about the power of crowdfunding. He also took some time to give Crowdfunding Campuses his thoughts on the importance of crowdfunding within higher education.

Crowdfunding Campuses: If you look at the crowdfunding portals today, you have the “catch-all platforms” and the “niche-platforms” that focus on a specific target audience. Are you more of a niche player or more of a catch-all platform?

BM: We are a very broad and open crowdfunding community. Most fall under one of four categories: arts, science/academic, entrepreneurship/small business, and social good.  Virtually every funding campaign falls into one of those four buckets. The DNA of the company is then built around three things: liberating ideas, how crowdfunding builds community, and teaching the world how to use crowdfunding. So we present opportunities to everyone.

Crowdfunding Campuses:  Will the JOBS Act & the pending legislation that’s anticipated on the equity-side of the industry change Rockethub’s approach at all, and if so, how will your business model be different a year from now when the regulations are anticipated to be concrete?

BM: We’ve been working with the JOBS Act for a while, giving feedback on the legislation. We testified in Congress on the power of crowdfunding. We just recently met last week with the White House on crowdfunding. We’re very excited about the JOBS Act and what it can do for entrepreneurs in the United States. We’re always going to keep our product, but the talks that we’re having with the SEC are very favorable and we believe we’ll be able take advantage of it.

Crowdfunding Campuses: If you could speak to students about crowdfunding and the potential that the industry has in its ability to influence their lives, what would the overall value-added proposition be for the average student to encourage him/her to get involved immediately?

BM:  Think of us in 2002 talking about social media and how big it can be, and now in 2012, we’re talking about social funding. The next 10 years will be dominated by social funding the way the last 10 were by social media. Anyone who has an idea that they want to bring to life, they don’t have to rely on traditional funding modules. They can reach out to communities and bypass traditional mechanism to make things happen.

Crowdfunding Campuses: Given the declining rate in which college graduates are able to land a job that is commiserate with their education, do you think educators should begin teaching students about crowdfunding? If so, what can RocketHub offer educators to help them update their curriculum?

BM: Anyone that’s interested in any entrepreneurial endeavor, either creative or business, needs to know about crowdfunding. It’s becoming a staple in the creative world and will quickly become a staple in the world of entrepreneurship in the next couple of years. What we offer to our users and to folks that show up to our lectures are crowdfunding success patterns based on real data that we have as a platform that has funded millions of dollars of projects. We can show, here’s what you do for success, and here’s what you don’t do. If you follow these patterns you’ll have success and if you don’t you wont. These are thing things that are important to learn.

Crowdfunding Campuses: Colleges are facing tough times now.  Increasing tuition costs, reduced availability of grant money, decreasing alumni donor pools, outdated technology, and under-resourced classrooms are among the many hurdles faced by institutions.  How can RocketHub help institutions lighten the financial burden?

BM: One of the most powerful assets colleges have are their alumni and the community they are in. This whole model is really driven by communities and project leaders making things happen in those communities. You want to put together a project that will be exciting in the community and have the community rally around them. You want to have a way of giving back to that community. There will need to be some type of return, either emotional, a good or service, or a financial return, in the dynamic. But the network is there.

Crowdfunding Campuses: Has RocketHub had any successful funding raises to date that are specific to collegian institutions, alumni groups, fraternities/sororities, or other student-groups?

BM:  We’ve had a fair amount. One that pops to mind, there’s a student that raised $25,000 to fund a scholarship. Kids are raising money to go off to school. This is a very high leveraged way of fundraising now. I don’t see bake sales and carwashes going away completely, but we’re seeing a fusion of that with crowdfunding now.

Crowdfunding Campuses:  What is your personal vision for integrating crowdfunding into higher education?

BM: Crowdfunding is a movement, especially for the next five years. The technology is easy. I’ve been lecturing on campuses all this past week. Within the next week, we’ll be launching a new platform on RocketHub that has a new success school and we’ll be building out that educational part further. A lot of entrepreneurs don’t know about all of the traditional modules like venture capitalists or grants. But crowdfunding is highly accessible, so especially for folks that are at the early stages, like college students are, crowdfunding could be a great entry into that space. They need to know it’s a valid option and will gain more popularity and will have wonderful side effects besides just the funding. It’s very important.

Andrew Rachmell, co-founder of peerbackers, sat down to answer some of our questions about crowdfunding, with emphasis on its place in higher education and the role crowdfunding should play at colleges and universities in the future.

Crowdfunding Campuses: If you look at the crowdfunding portals today, you have the “catch-all platforms” and the “niche-platforms” that focus on a specific target audience. Are you more of a niche player or more of a catch-all platform?

AR: We focus on the Generation Y audience, which is the 15 to 30 age bracket. We focus a lot on education and that’s why we know about Handshake360° and Crowdfunding Campuses. We’re very much into partnering with universities and teaching students and teens. They are tech savvy and social network savvy. Social networking is a big component in being successful in crowdfunding. That demographic lends itself to being successful there. We’ve had a lot of success with it, and success breeds success, so we stay with what’s working. Especially with high school and junior high school today, there’s not enough educational entrepreneurial stuff going on that we see, so it allows us the opportunity to educate students not just in crowdfunding but in entrepreneurial skill sets.

Crowdfunding Campuses:  Will the JOBS Act & the pending legislation that’s anticipated on the equity-side of the industry change peerbackers’ approach at all, and if so, how will your business model be different a year from now when the regulations are anticipated to be concrete?

AR: We are certainly anticipating embracing the new equity crowdfunding opportunity, but we’re not going to get rid of the traditional crowdfunding model either. It’s been very successful for us and we believe the marketplace could use both models. We certainly anticipate embracing it. We’re looking forward to seeing the guidelines that come about from the SEC Oversight Committee. (peerbackers) has to gear up to offer an equity crowdfunding service. You can’t just take your same platform and expect it to work with the equity crowdfunding model.  We’re optimistic about what it can provide though.

Crowdfunding Campuses: If you could speak to students about crowdfunding and the potential that the industry has in its ability to influence their lives, what would the overall value-added proposition be for the average student to encourage him/her to get involved immediately?

AR: It’s a great way to test market your idea, for starters. If you have a business idea, it’s a superb way to test market that. You have an opportunity to raise money without giving up any equity of your company, so that’s a great advantage. And you get to test market your product. By the very nature of crowdfunding, you have the possibility of attracting media attention and creating buzz, especially if the campaign goes viral. You can do this, and you can raise money in less than 45 days and that’s a wonderful thing. Those reasons would be attractive to anyone, but especially students and younger folks today who may not have the ability to attract a business loan, this is the perfect vehicle to secure funding for your project. If you believe your business will need significant growth capital later on, having success in crowdfunding early on will help in gaining angel investors and venture capitalists later on.  This also is a great way to demonstrate that you have support of the marketplace. You have the opportunity to build customers while crowdfunding through the people that are supporting you.  If they are supporting your project, it shows you have customer interest there. You can convey the idea, raise the money and then build the product, rather than having to build the project first in order to raise the money.

Crowdfunding Campuses: Given the declining rate in which college graduates are able to land a job that is commiserate with their education, do you think educators should begin teaching students about crowdfunding? If so, what can peerbackers offer educators to help them update their curriculum?

AR: I wholeheartedly believe 100 percent that it’s imperative that we teach more entrepreneurial skills to students today. peerbackers is very much committed to doing that. We provide one-on-one coaching, do webinars, and have workshops with schools, and have been doing that for quite a while.  Given the economy and the way corporations operate today, there are fewer and fewer opportunities for students graduating and not as much loyalty between employer and employee today. Knowing you can develop a skillset at an early age to run your own business is invaluable and can provide students with that opportunity to run their own business. Today, I think it should be one of the top priorities for educators to teach this to our youngsters so they don’t have to rely on someone else for their career, and so they can succeed on their own.

Crowdfunding Campuses: Colleges are facing tough times now.  Increasing tuition costs, reduced availability of grant money, decreasing alumni donor pools, outdated technology, and under-resourced classrooms are among the many hurdles faced by institutions.  How can peerbackers help institutions lighten the financial burden?

AR: We have a lot of examples at peerbackers of students raising money for educational journeys and school related initiatives, but not necessarily college tuition. Lots of initiatives are going on for school activities though, like paying for a school trip or paying for things for the band, things of that nature. But I think crowdfunding could help students raise money for tuition and I’m sure it’s happening today.

The way students have raised money and the way they continue to raise money is an antiquated approach, a 100-year old method of going door to door, doing carwashes, etc. It’s a great thing but it requires a lot of people, sometimes start-up capital to do these kinds of things. Crowdfunding is really the most effective way to raise money for any school related activity or initiative. You can raise money from people who don’t live near you, which you can’t do going door to door. No question about it, crowdfunding is going to replace the old model of fundraising.

Crowdfunding Campuses: Has peerbackers had any successful funding raises to date that are specific to collegian institutions, alumni groups, fraternities/sororities, or other student-groups?

peerbackers has had more than 1,000 projects, with three specific to higher education highlighted below.

– Spectrum Experience: Run by two students, one from the University of Arizona. They raised $5,100 for a venture that offers empowerment workshops for students and non-profits.

– Derek Goes Global: A freshman engineering student raised $2,365 to help fund a three-week engineering study abroad program in China.

– Bad Science Watch: A group worked to strengthen consumer protection regulation in Canada and promote good science in public policy, raising $3,500.

For more information on peerbackers, visit http://peerbackers.com/ or follow them on Facebook or Twitter.